Feeding Guide

Switching Your Pets to BARF

There are many ways to do this. Mostly, a rapid switch is preferred. Occasionally, people strike acceptance problems, particularly with cats. Both dogs and cats, can exhibit gastrointestinal upsets as their body adjusts to the new food. This is more likely with kibble fed pets. If you are switching from home-produced foods (cooked or raw), difficulties with acceptance or gastrointestinal upset are far less common.

The Rapid Switch to Dr. B's Genuine Aussie R.A.W. Patties.

This is very simple. You simply go ahead and do it! Yesterday you fed your pet kibble and/or canned pet food or home cooked food or whatever, today you begin to feed the BARF patties. Generally, the rapid switch is the simplest, most trouble free and most successful method, no matter the age or health status of the pet.

However, with cats and little dogs, there can be acceptance problems. The other potential problem with the rapid switch is digestive upsets. This is more likely with pets that are older or have digestive problems or impaired immune systems. However, some older, kibble fed pets [and some younger ones!], develop digestive upsets (diarrhea/vomiting) when both raw food and kibble are in their digestive tracts, in which case, we have no choice, it has to be the rapid switch.

TIP: It can be helpful to allow your pet a one or two-day fast, prior to switching diets.

Fasting allows for a small amount of detoxification and also brings to your assistance a mighty ally - HUNGER! When switching after a fast, it is best to offer a number of small meals for the first few days, rather than one big one!

ALSO: Feeding a probiotic, such as natural yogurt or probiotic powder with the new food will help ensure a smooth transition with fewer tummy upsets.

Warning: dogs can tolerate long fasts, whereas cats, especially overweight cats, should not be fasted longer than 24 hours, or at the very most, 48 hours. This is because cats, most particularly fat cats, can develop a fatal disease - Hepatic Lipidosis if fasted for long periods.

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The Slow Switch to Dr. B's Genuine Aussie R.A.W.

This method can take from one to four weeks, or up to six months, depending on the circumstances. Unfortunately, some pets never make the switch completely. Their owners often continue to feed them kibble - a common reason being -"just to be sure we don't leave out any important nutrients!" This is not a great idea!

  1. You can offer one meal of Dr. B's Genuine Aussie R.A.W. Patties, followed by one meal of the old food, and gradually feed fewer meals of the old type. If a pet accepts this method with no problems, it is a fair indication that it has a very robust digestive system and would handle the rapid switch extremely well.
  2. The second way to go about it is to offer both types of food at the same time and gradually offer less and less of the old food and more of the new food. For example, feed twenty-five percent of the new food for a few days, fifty percent for a few days, seventy-five percent for a few days and then one hundred percent. As noted above, some pets will develop gastrointestinal upset, as they cannot tolerate these two different types of food in their digestive system at the same time.
  3. The third slow switch method is to physically break the old and new food down and combine the two foods into a homogeneous mass. This way you can start out with small amounts of the new and gradually decrease the old over time. This works well with a pet that is reluctant to try the new fare. Many cats will fit into this category. However, this too may result in gastrointestinal upset for the reasons I have just mentioned.
  4. This method involves introducing the new food in a cooked state, and gradually feeding it in a more raw state. This works well with fussy pets and may be useful with cats.

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How Much Should I Feed My Adult Dog?

Adult dogs can be fed between 2% and 6% of their bodyweight daily, depending on life stage, reproductive state, activity level, health and individual requirements. For the average stay at home middle aged dog, we recommend starting at the 2% - 3% level, that is, with one of Dr. B's patties per 12 kg of bodyweight daily, with or without some raw meaty bones and then make any adjustments necessary to maintain the ideal weight.

Remember - a healthy dog is not over-weight!

If weight loss is required, the Kangaroo recipe is ideal. Additionally, you may mix any of the Dr. B's diets with vegetable or fruit pulp from your juicer.

In determining how much to feed, always adjust the amount fed to maintain the desired body-weight and condition, with a good place to start being as follows-

Number of Patties to Feed Per Day Based on % of Bodyweight
Adult Dog
Weight 2% Bodyweight 4% Bodyweight 6% bodyweight
5-7 Kg 1/2 1 1 1/2
10-12 Kg 1 2 3
20-25 Kg 2 4 6
35-40 kg 3 5 7
50+ Kg 4 6 8

When feeding 50% patties and 50% raw meaty bones, feed half the above plus an equal amount of raw meaty bones. This may be fed as two meals daily, a patty meal and a raw meaty bone meal.

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How Much Should I Feed My Adult Cat?

Feed 4% of bodyweight per day (divided into 2 to 3 meals)

Always adjust amount fed to maintain desired body weight and condition.

For simple obesity, reduce amount of food fed, reduce bones and reduce fat but do not starve the cat. Calories fed may also be reduced by adding small amounts of low glycaemic index vegetable pulp to the patties (eg. from your juicer).

When feeding 50% patties and 50% raw meaty bones, feed half the above plus an equal amount raw meaty bones. This may be fed as two meals daily, a patty meal and a raw meaty bone meal.


Weight 4% Bodyweight 5% Bodyweight 6% bodyweight
1 Kg 0.30 0.50 0.60
2 Kg 0.60 0.75 1.00
3 Kg 1.00 1.30 1.50
4 kg 1.50 1.75 2.00
5 Kg 1.75 2.00 2.50
6 Kg 2.00 2.50 3.00
Number of Patties to Feed Per Day Based on % of Bodyweight
Adult Cat

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How Much Do We Feed Pregnant Female Dogs?

For the first two thirds of pregnancy - feed as per a normal dog, i.e. 2% - 3% of bodyweight per day. For the last third of pregnancy - feed 3% - 4% of bodyweight per day.

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How Much Do We Feed Pregnant Female Cats?

First third of pregnancy - 4% of bodyweight per day (divided into 2 to 3 meals)

Second third of pregnancy - 4-5% bodyweight per day (divided into 3 meals)

Last third of pregnancy - 5% bodyweight per day (divided into 4 meals)

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What About Working/Racing/Active Dogs?

Feed 3% - 6% of bodyweight per day when working/active. The more active dogs require food with a higher fat content to increase energy supply (We recommend Dr. B's 'Chicken,' 'Combination' or 'Pork' flavours). Feed 2% - 3% of bodyweight per day when not working.

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How Much Do We Feed Lactating Female Dogs?

Depending on litter size and size of puppies - feed from between 3% and 6% of bodyweight - up to free choice. Once again, we need food with a high fat content, but also high protein and plenty of calcium of course! Dr B's 'Chicken', 'Combination' and 'Pork' flavours are recommended.

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How Much Do We Feed Lactating Female Cats?

Depending on litter size and age of kittens, feed from between 5-6% of bodyweight per day - up to free choice

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How Much Should I Feed My Puppy?

To support their growth, puppies are generally fed, up to twice as much of Dr. B's Genuine Aussie R.A.W. as adult dogs. Additionally, it is an excellent idea to feed them as wide a variety of different whole raw foods as possible, to ensure acceptance of these foods throughout life.

  1. Small to Medium Breeds: Feed 3%-5% of bodyweight per day - dividing the food into 2 - 4 feeds - the younger the pup, the more frequent the feeds. Do not add extra calcium. Do feed soft bones daily, e.g. chicken necks or wings.
  2. Giant Breeds: Feed 2%-4% of bodyweight per day - divide the food into two to three feeds daily. It is important to grow them slowly. Adding extra vegetable pulp will slow growth in a healthy fashion. Do not add extra calcium. Do feed soft bones daily, e.g. chicken necks or wings.

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How Much Should I Feed My Kitten?

Feed 5-6% of bodyweight per day (divided into 4 to 5 meals)

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Feeding Pets with Health Issues such as Liver, Kidney, Pancreatic Disease.

These Pets usually require extra vegetable pulp added to the diet. They may sometimes require less land animal fat with the addition of extra marine-mammal, or fish oil.

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Obese Pets

For simple obesity, dilute Dr. B's patties with low Glycemic vegetable pulp from your juicer.

And remember, for extreme obesity, the leanest patty is Kangaroo!

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